Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    3

    Purchase strips or mill strips? - beginner

    I have ordered plans (prospector), purchased book and begining to build strong back. I live in Colorado. Questions is do I purchase strips or do I try to find wood locally to then turn into strips. Budget is tight (2 kids getting ready for college - but also wanted to build it with them before they go in several years) so i can't afford to purchase the whole kit. i was thinking about pruchasing the strips separatly (as well as the gunwals) and then purchase items as i go. Does any one have suggestions on getting started this way.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Garden City, MI
    Posts
    17

    Wood & Space...

    Hi Dean,

    I can relate... I'm building the 17' Nomad and am just playing around with the molds, stems, seats, etc. as I have some white ash locally. I'm going to relocate to the Ozarks soon and won't actually start the strong back until then BUT, the big issue is what kind of wood are your going to use and how much space do you have to work and with what tools. To cut and rout strips that are 18', you will need about 40' to handle them or a big hole in the garage wall if you work in the winter time. You will need a table saw, planer, router with table, bead and cove bits and a whole bunch of other stuff. Fortunately, I have the tools and I personally want to make my strips but getting western red cedar has been a real eye opener for me.

    It's just not readily available in the mid west and by the time I ship from the west coast, I might as well buy Noah's strips. It's almost a no brainer because I haven't found the cost savings yet to make my own. I have found bueatiful red wood which is a little more brittle than WRC but it is available in long lengths and if I sort through the stacks, I can find enough with good edge grain. As a traditionalist, I want to use WRC so I'm leaning towards buying Noah's strips unless I can find some wood at reasonable prices.

    Keep in touch and let me know how your progress is, OK If you want a few sites that have construction photo's, etc. drop me an email at jmgledhill@comcast.net

    CYA, Joe

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    3
    Thanks, for the tips. I have everything but the planer and the router bits. the space is an issue I hadn't thought of (other than i have enough space to build it - a one car garage), but probably not for the milling. Now that I am thinking in the right direction, I believe, I will just order the strips from Noah, since this is my first build. It takes out a lot of the quess work and possible aggrivation. As you mentioned, it appears that there is not much savings in buying and milling the strips. However, I do understand the desire to do all of the work - from the get go - gives the builder that much more control. Good luck, and I'll keep in touch.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Garden City, MI
    Posts
    17

    Sources...

    Here as some good sites for you to look at: The WCHA is a great organization that had a ton of information on there forum and the other two sites are photo sequences of builidng two different kinds of canoes... Enjoylll

    http://forums.wcha.org/
    http://www.aracnet.com/~ncglad/canoeentry.htm
    http://www.michneboat.com/Building%2...assie%20II.htm

    CYA, Joe

    Most of all... don't forget Ted Moores "Canoecraft". I think it the best book out there and highly recommended.
    Last edited by Woodchuck; 01-28-2005 at 02:57 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the email sites. They will help as I start. I am trying to read everything I can, so I can plan a head prior to starting. Sometimes, though, you just have to jump in and get started. I do have Ted's book and have read it, and re-read it. It's a great book. Thanks for the tips!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2
    Dean,
    I am in Colorado also (Lakewood) and have been shopping for wood locally for the past month. If you go the route of milling your own strips, check out Specialty Wood Products in Aurora for clear WRC at good prices. They do mostly cedar siding business but have about a dozen local canoe guys who buy from them. It looks like the cost will be a lot less than pre-milled, around $120-$150. Lengths to 20 feet are in stock.

    I also lucked out and found 18 foot mahogany for gunwales at Centenial Hardwood. Rockler woodworking does a semi-annual wood sale and sometimes has mahogany crotch lumber for decks. The mahogany is pretty pricey stuff ($10 a b/f) but for the time you put into one of these boats, its hard not to build what you want.

    This is my first boat too, the epoxy part seems daunting.
    Regards,
    Gregg


 

Similar Threads

  1. Want to mill my own strips, lumber sources?
    By aarongreen123 in forum Cedar Strip Construction Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-28-2006, 07:47 PM
  2. Importance of full length strips
    By aarongreen123 in forum Cedar Strip Construction Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-18-2006, 09:14 PM
  3. S&G Mill Creek 16.5
    By zodiac in forum Stitch & Glue Construction Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-03-2005, 07:10 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •