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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Norhtern Wisconsin
    Posts
    6

    Joining Plywood questions

    I am going to build Bolgers Micro Trawler, and am adding 4 feet to the aft. I had planned on joining the plywood with a joint if 3 inch and 6inch tape. I planned on cutting a 3 groove in the ply and taping them together, then feathering the groove out to 6 inches and putting the 6 inch tape on. My question is every one is talking scarfing, and I am wondering if the taped joint is as good, worse, or better? Also, would it be lots more work than it is worth?

    Thanks, Stephen

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia
    Posts
    7
    I do not think it is a good idea, scarfing it the way to go. If you want info on scarfing go to http://www.boatbuilder.org/godzilliscarfing.htm . Good luck with your project.
    ---Joel---

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    15
    I found it difficult to understand the description of what you were doing.

    Butt block ing works well to extended paenl length. Generally, you have to have a butt-block as thick as the wood you're joining and about 12" total length. Hard to say exactly what you need with seeng the plans.

    Fiberglassing splices work in many instances as well. You'll need double layers of biax on each side of the joint.

    Contact the designer for input on the best way to do it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Norhtern Wisconsin
    Posts
    6

    Splice

    I was thinking about making a fiberglass splice, but am going to go with the scarf instead.
    Next question though. Do I need to thicken the epoxy for the scarf joint? And what about joining two sheets together as in laminating them, should I thicken the epoxy there also? And if I need to thicken it, wilol wood flour be ok to use?
    thanks again, Stephen

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    15
    Yes you should thicken it (I prefer wood flour) to about a ketchup-like consistency. That way it'll still fill in the little valleys but won't run out everywhere.

    You don't need high clamping pressure. Only enough pressure to hold the pieces of wood together.

    Fiberglass splices are nice for looks. But I often prefer wooden butt blocks on canoes and kayaks because you get the advantage of the extra stiffness.

    Matt - JEM Watercraft

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    14

    Scarfing

    I skarfed the plywood on my daysailer and I applied 6" tape to both sides and epoxied. The joints sanded down nicely and are almost invisible. Good advice JEM and good luck Blacksmith.

    Andy


 

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